Visualizing Data to Promote Better Public Policy

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There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. Each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. By this metric, Indiana has the fifth most productive state and local government workforce in the country.


On state and local government employment, Indiana ranks well below the national average with 15.42 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector which is -8.1 percent below the national average of 16.77 and is the 42nd highest ratio in the country.


Indiana_State_and_Local_Employment_Rank_2012.jpg


Additionally, on state and local government compensation, Indiana ranks very low with government employees earning -1.6 percent less than those in the private sector—significantly below the national average of 11.7 percent and is the 42nd lowest compensation ratio in the country.


Indiana_State_and_Local_Compensation_Rank_2012.jpg

 

Both wages and salaries and benefits contribute to Indiana’s low government compensation ratio. On state and local wages and salaries, Indiana employees earn -13.5 percent less than those in the private sector—the 37th highest wages and salaries ratio in the country and significantly below than the national average of -8.8 percent.


Indiana_State_and_Local_Wages_and_Salaries_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local benefits, Indiana employees earn 50.7 percent more than those in the private sector which is 55.9 percent lower than the national average of 115 percent and is the 4th lowest benefit ratio in the country. Though the differential is highest for benefits, wages and salaries weigh more heavily since it constitute 72 percent of total compensation.


Indiana_State_and_Local_Benefits_Rank_2012.jpg


Note: Recent data updates include significant definitional changes, especially to benefits which are now based on an accrual basis as opposed to a cash-basis. The changes currently go back to 2000 so comparisons between pre- and post-2000 data must be used with caution.


Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, level of government, and over time.


Click here to view the methodology behind this important government workforce data.


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There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. Each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. By this metric, Vermont has the sixth least productive state and local government workforce in the country.


On state and local government employment, Vermont has 17.96 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector which is 7.1 percent above the national average of 16.77 and is the 21st highest ratio in the country.


Vermont_State_and_Local_Employment_Rank_2012.jpg


Additionally, on state and local government compensation, Vermont ranks very poorly with government employees earning 26.2 percent more than those in the private sector which is 124 percent higher than the national average of 11.7 percent and is the 6th highest compensation ratio in the country. The high compensation ratio compounds Vermont’s higher than average employment ratio.


Vermont_State_and_Local_Compensation_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local wages and salaries, Vermont’s employees earn 4.3 percent more than those in the private sector—the 4th highest wages and salaries ratio in the country and higher than the national average of -8.8 percent.


Vermont_State_and_Local_Wages_and_Salaries_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local benefits, Vermont’s employees earn 120.9 percent more than those in the private sector which is 5.1 percent higher than the national average of 115 percent and is the 9th highest benefit ratio in the country.


Vermont_State_and_Local_Benefits_Rank_2012.jpg


Note: Recent data updates include significant definitional changes, especially to benefits which are now based on an accrual basis as opposed to a cash-basis. The changes currently go back to 2000 so comparisons between pre- and post-2000 data must be used with caution.


Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, level of government, and over time.


Click here to view the methodology behind this important government workforce data.


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There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. Each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. By this metric, Hawaii has the fifth least productive state and local government workforce in the country.


On state and local government employment, Hawaii has 18.32 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector—9.2 percent above the national average of 16.77 and is the 19th highest ratio in the country.


Hawaii_State_and_Local_Employment_Rank_2012.jpg


Additionally, on state and local government compensation, Hawaii ranks very poorly with government employees earning 26.2 percent more than those in the private sector—125 percent higher than the national average of 11.7 percent and is the 5th highest compensation ratio in the country. The high compensation ratio compounds Hawaii’s higher than average employment ratio.


Hawaii_State_and_Local_Compensation_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local wages and salaries, Hawaii’s employees earn 8.1 percent more than those in the private sector—the 3rd highest wages and salaries ratio in the country and higher than the national average of -8.8 percent.


Hawaii_State_and_Local_Wages_and_Salaries_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local benefits, Hawaii’s employees earn 103.6 percent more than those in the private sector—or -10 percent lower than the national average of 115 percent and is the 16th highest benefit ratio in the country.


Hawaii_State_and_Local_Benefits_Rank_2012.jpg


Note: Recent data updates include significant definitional changes, especially to benefits which are now based on an accrual basis as opposed to a cash-basis. The changes currently go back to 2000 so comparisons between pre- and post-2000 data must be used with caution.


Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, level of government, and over time.


Click here to view the methodology behind this important government workforce data.


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There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. Each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. By this metric, Kansas has the fourth most productive state and local government workforce in the country.


On state and local government employment, Kansas ranks well above the national average with 20.84 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector—24.2 percent above the national average of 16.77 and is the 7th highest ratio in the country.


Kansas_State_and_Local_Employment_Rank_2012.jpg


However, on state and local government compensation, Kansas ranks very low with government employees earning -6.8 percent less than those in the private sector—significantly below the national average of 11.7 percent and is the 4th lowest compensation ratio in the country. The low compensation ratio more than offsets the Kansas’s above average employment ratio.


Kansas_State_and_Local_Compensation_Rank_2012.jpg


Both wages and salaries and benefits contribute to Kansas’s low government compensation ratio. On state and local wages and salaries, Kansas employees earn -19.9 percent less than those in the private sector—the 2nd lowest wages and salaries ratio in the country and significantly below than the national average of -8.8 percent.


Kansas_State_and_Local_Wages_and_Salaries_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local benefits, Kansas employees earn 58.9 percent more than those in the private sector—49 percent lower than the national average of 115 percent and is the 9th lowest benefit ratio in the country. Though the differential is highest for benefits, wages and salaries weigh more heavily since it constitute 72 percent of total compensation.


Kansas_State_and_Local_Benefits_Rank_2012.jpg


Note: Recent data updates include significant definitional changes, especially to benefits which are now based on an accrual basis as opposed to a cash-basis. The changes currently go back to 2000 so comparisons between pre- and post-2000 data must be used with caution.


Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, level of government, and over time.


Click here to view the methodology behind this important government workforce data.


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There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. Each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. By this metric, California has the fourth least productive state and local government workforce in the country.


On state and local government employment, California has 16.71 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector—0.4 percent below the national average of 16.77 and is the 32nd highest ratio in the country.


California_State_and_Local_Employment_Rank_2012.jpg


Additionally, on state and local government compensation, California ranks very poorly with government employees earning 28.9 percent more than those in the private sector—147 percent higher than the national average of 11.7 percent and is the 3rd highest compensation ratio in the country. The high compensation ratio more than offsets California’s lower than average employment ratio.


California_State_and_Local_Compensation_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local wages and salaries, California’s employees earn -2.5 percent less than those in the private sector—the 14th highest wages and salaries ratio in the country and higher than the national average of -8.8 percent.


California_State_and_Local_Wages_and_Salaries_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local benefits, California employees earn 195.6 percent more than those in the private sector—a whooping 70 percent higher than the national average of 115 percent and is the 3rd highest benefit ratio in the country. Though the differential is highest for benefits, wages and salaries weigh more heavily since it constitutes 64 percent of total compensation.


California_State_and_Local_Benefits_Rank_2012.jpg


Note: Recent data updates include significant definitional changes, especially to benefits which are now based on an accrual basis as opposed to a cash-basis. The changes currently go back to 2000 so comparisons between pre- and post-2000 data must be used with caution.


Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, level of government, and over time.


Click here to view the methodology behind this important government workforce data.


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Comments

There are two major elements to look at when examining a state’s government workforce—the number of employees and the level of their pay. Each element is measured relative to the national average and summed together to obtain an overall measure of workforce productivity. By this metric, Texas has the third most productive state and local government workforce in the country.


On state and local government employment, Texas ranks as just above average with 16.94 employees for every 100 employees in the private sector—1 percent above the national average of 16.77 and is the 30th highest ratio in the country.


Texas_State_and_Local_Employment_Rank_2012.jpg


However, on state and local government compensation, Texas ranks very low with government employees earning -7.2 percent less than those in the private sector—significantly below the national average of 11.7 percent and is the third lowest compensation ratio in the country. The low compensation ratio more than offsets the Texas’s above average employment ratio.


Texas_State_and_Local_Compensation_Rank_2012.jpg


Both wages and salaries and benefits contribute to Texas’s low government compensation ratio. On state and local wages and salaries, Texas employees earn -18.1 percent less than those in the private sector—the 5th lowest wages and salaries ratio in the country and significantly below than the national average of -8.8 percent.


Texas_State_and_Local_Wages_and_Salaries_Rank_2012.jpg


On state and local benefits, Texas employees earn 53.7 percent more than those in the private sector—53 percent lower than the national average of 115 percent and is the 6th lowest benefit ratio in the country. Though the differential is highest for benefits, wages and salaries weigh more heavily since it constitute 75 percent of total compensation.


Texas_State_and_Local_Benefits_Rank_2012.jpg


Note: Recent data updates include significant definitional changes, especially to benefits which are now based on an accrual basis as opposed to a cash-basis. The changes currently go back to 2000 so comparisons between pre- and post-2000 data must be used with caution.


Click here to view our full government workforce data app with details by state, level of government, and over time


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