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There are two major components to population change:


  • First, net natural population change is the difference between births and deaths and can be both positive (more births than deaths) or negative (more deaths than births).

  • Second, net migration population change is the difference in the domestic and international movement of people and can be both positive (more people moving in than out) or negative (more people moving out than in).


Demographics is destiny! In contemporary America, the general rule has been one of increasing population. Immigrants arrived from distant shores and the stork delivered new bundles of joy. That, however, is changing.


Demographic Winter is a new term to describe falling population levels. In America, demographic winter is mostly the result of plummeting birth rates and, to a lesser degree, the aging of the baby boom generation. The aging impact on America’s population has been offset by longer life-spans, but a baby never born has exponential ripple effects on the size of the future population.


As a result of too few babies being born, many states and counties will experience a shrinking working-age population and eventually shrinking overall populations. This will create the same conditions as a slow moving economic depression. Already, Maine and West Virginia have more deaths than births and more states are following close behind.


Read more to better understand the negative economic impacts of demographic winter.

 

Demographic winter is mostly the result of plummeting birth rates and, to a lesser degree, the aging of the baby boom generation. The aging impact on America’s population has been offset by longer life-spans, but a baby never born has exponential ripple effects on the size of the future population. As a result of too few babies being born, many parts of America will experience a shrinking working-age population and eventually shrinking overall populations. - See more at: http://www.keypolicydata.com/demographics/#sthash.miXPKgrX.dpuf

Be sure to check out our demographic analysis by state (coming soon):  Alabama  Alaska  Arizona  Arkansas  California  Colorado  Connecticut  Delaware  Florida  Georgia  Hawaii  Idaho  Illinois  Indiana  Iowa  Kansas  Kentucky  Louisiana  Maine  Maryland  Massachusetts  Michigan  Minnesota  Mississippi  Missouri  Montana  Nebraska  Nevada  New Hampshire  New Jersey  New Mexico  New York  North Carolina  North Dakota  Ohio  Oklahoma  Oregon  Pennsylvania  Rhode Island  South Carolina  South Dakota  Tennessee  Texas  Utah  Vermont  Virginia  Washington  West Virginia  Wisconsin  Wyoming

 
 
 

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